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In these uncertain times, planning for the Sudbury Gardening Festival has been put on hold until the YMCA Centre for Life and Parkside Centre re-open.

In early May, the Sudbury Horticultural Society will make a decision as to whether it will be possible to host the event on May 30th - as planned.

Once we have decided on the best way to proceed, we will share those plans with the gardening community.

CORONA VIRUS ADVICE FROM MASTER GARDENER LEIMONE WAITE

" With major changes and lots of unknowns there is always anxiety. I would like to remind folks of the many benefits of plants and interacting with nature during this time of social distancing.

During your day take a few minutes to tend to your house plants, take a walk in the yard or take a virtual tour of a botanical garden.

Besides the obvious benefits of providing us with food and the oxygen that we breathe, studies show that just having a few potted plants in your workspace or home can improve overall happiness and stress reduction.

One Kansas State University study found that patients that had plants in their hospital rooms reported less pain, had lower heart rates and blood pressure, less fatigue and anxiety and recovered sooner.

Other studies show that having access to a garden space at a hospital or a school helped to lower blood pressure, improve mental attentiveness, lower levels of anxiety, and improve a person’s overall happiness and wellbeing.

There are a number of studies that show even viewing pictures of plants or nature can help reduce stress.

During this time of working from home, you might also think about starting a garden, even if it is only a few plants in some containers on the patio or in your windowsill.

Studies have repeatedly shown that tending to plants can help take our minds of stressful stuff and have an overall calming effect on the mind and body.

In addition to helping with stress, several studies have shown that interacting with plants and actively gardening can help boost the immune system and improve recovery from illness.

Even if you tend to have a “black thumb” and kill most plants, there is a wonderful sense of accomplishment when you see a seed sprouting or a new leaf on your house plant. The science is pretty clear that we are happier and healthier when we are working with plants."